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Post Info TOPIC: Swine Flu surely come to Lao soon as Thailand already got 89 cases
Anonymous

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Swine Flu surely come to Lao soon as Thailand already got 89 cases
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Thailand now has 89 cases of a new swine flu. Mostly speading in one of high school in Bangkok. Now other school near that area must be closed as well as all Tutor schools must be closed to prevent from the flu contract.

I don't think that thermo scan works 100% to detects the people at the airport. I concern just about our country is still poor and no money to buy the anti-flu serums to stocks in the country.

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Anonymous

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Yes this is no one can answer of this questions. How can we stock the Serum if our countryt no money to buy it? right?


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Speak-out

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I hope our Lao people Don't get mix-up Between Flu-like symptom. and Swine Flu. What's flu like symtom? and What's different between  flu like symtoms and Swine flu? Here it is.. Flu like symptoms: Has a fever over 100 degree F. Cough, Sore throat, Runny nose or Stuffy nose. Swine flu: The symptoms maybe experienced with Muscle pain, Fatique, and sometimes Vommiting or Diarrhea.. so this is was killed many people in Mexico especially the young kids, Now it's spreading all over the world.and also the Media played the key role too. I mean Swine Panic of 09 hit. When i say hit , I mean hit the media. There wasn't a news outlet anywhere unaffected by hype. After scaring the bejesus out of every one, the Government switched gears and began urging the population to remaincalm and not over react. as it now turn out ,the severity of the flu may not be as bad as first thought. in fact, it may a heck  of a lot milder than our run of the mill seasonal flu, Which kills something like 35,000-36,000 people annually. and to be on the safe side, I'm taking basic precautions by washing my hands, cover my mounth when i cough, and not drinking any CORONA.

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Anonymous

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Update.....today at Thailand got more infection so totally 150...very fast

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Anonymous

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Colona with salt and lemon or limes will help prevent you
from the Swine Flu virus. As lao don't worry about this virus; Beer Lao will kill them.Drink more and more Beer
Lao for Khon Lao and free of Swine Flu.


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Anonymous

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it is so late to spread in Laos now? because the world 's media won't report it, if it spreads after mexico, i think laos must has become a famous country as swine flu and become 2nd country has swine flu after Mexico? don't get mad brother, i know it's imposible, because almost countries on earth has found the virus. i personally think that swine flu or A(H1N1) is a kind of flu that serious and more dangerious than seasoning flu, normal people get this virus won't have any serious react, oppositely the weak people will have quite serious impact and die. don't be so panic and afraid of this virus, even thought the WHO has put up the alerm level to 6th, it doesn't mean that the world would face the serious disease.

Laos and WHO work together in possible way to inspect and pay attention of the borders, specially at the wattai and luangprabang airport where there are lots traveller from the neighbor. don;t worry my lao folks , lao people love peace and believe in buddha, buddha never forget usblankstare

 



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Anonymous

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World now at the start of 2009 influenza pandemic

Dr Margaret Chan
Director-General of the World Health Organization

Ladies and gentlemen,

In late April, WHO announced the emergence of a novel influenza A virus.

This particular H1N1 strain has not circulated previously in humans. The virus is entirely new.

The virus is contagious, spreading easily from one person to another, and from one country to another. As of today, nearly 30,000 confirmed cases have been reported in 74 countries.

This is only part of the picture. With few exceptions, countries with large numbers of cases are those with good surveillance and testing procedures in place.

Spread in several countries can no longer be traced to clearly-defined chains of human-to-human transmission. Further spread is considered inevitable.

I have conferred with leading influenza experts, virologists, and public health officials. In line with procedures set out in the International Health Regulations, I have sought guidance and advice from an Emergency Committee established for this purpose.

On the basis of available evidence, and these expert assessments of the evidence, the scientific criteria for an influenza pandemic have been met.

I have therefore decided to raise the level of influenza pandemic alert from phase 5 to phase 6.

The world is now at the start of the 2009 influenza pandemic.

We are in the earliest days of the pandemic. The virus is spreading under a close and careful watch.

No previous pandemic has been detected so early or watched so closely, in real-time, right at the very beginning. The world can now reap the benefits of investments, over the last five years, in pandemic preparedness.

We have a head start. This places us in a strong position. But it also creates a demand for advice and reassurance in the midst of limited data and considerable scientific uncertainty.

Thanks to close monitoring, thorough investigations, and frank reporting from countries, we have some early snapshots depicting spread of the virus and the range of illness it can cause.

We know, too, that this early, patchy picture can change very quickly. The virus writes the rules and this one, like all influenza viruses, can change the rules, without rhyme or reason, at any time.

Globally, we have good reason to believe that this pandemic, at least in its early days, will be of moderate severity. As we know from experience, severity can vary, depending on many factors, from one country to another.

On present evidence, the overwhelming majority of patients experience mild symptoms and make a rapid and full recovery, often in the absence of any form of medical treatment.

Worldwide, the number of deaths is small. Each and every one of these deaths is tragic, and we have to brace ourselves to see more. However, we do not expect to see a sudden and dramatic jump in the number of severe or fatal infections.

We know that the novel H1N1 virus preferentially infects younger people. In nearly all areas with large and sustained outbreaks, the majority of cases have occurred in people under the age of 25 years.

In some of these countries, around 2% of cases have developed severe illness, often with very rapid progression to life-threatening pneumonia.

Most cases of severe and fatal infections have been in adults between the ages of 30 and 50 years.

This pattern is significantly different from that seen during epidemics of seasonal influenza, when most deaths occur in frail elderly people.

Many, though not all, severe cases have occurred in people with underlying chronic conditions. Based on limited, preliminary data, conditions most frequently seen include respiratory diseases, notably asthma, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and obesity.

At the same time, it is important to note that around one third to half of the severe and fatal infections are occurring in previously healthy young and middle-aged people.

Without question, pregnant women are at increased risk of complications. This heightened risk takes on added importance for a virus, like this one, that preferentially infects younger age groups.

Finally, and perhaps of greatest concern, we do not know how this virus will behave under conditions typically found in the developing world. To date, the vast majority of cases have been detected and investigated in comparatively well-off countries.

Let me underscore two of many reasons for this concern. First, more than 99% of maternal deaths, which are a marker of poor quality care during pregnancy and childbirth, occurs in the developing world.

Second, around 85% of the burden of chronic diseases is concentrated in low- and middle-income countries.

Although the pandemic appears to have moderate severity in comparatively well-off countries, it is prudent to anticipate a bleaker picture as the virus spreads to areas with limited resources, poor health care, and a high prevalence of underlying medical problems.

Ladies and gentlemen,

A characteristic feature of pandemics is their rapid spread to all parts of the world. In the previous century, this spread has typically taken around 6 to 9 months, even during times when most international travel was by ship or rail.

Countries should prepare to see cases, or the further spread of cases, in the near future. Countries where outbreaks appear to have peaked should prepare for a second wave of infection.

Guidance on specific protective and precautionary measures has been sent to ministries of health in all countries. Countries with no or only a few cases should remain vigilant.

Countries with widespread transmission should focus on the appropriate management of patients. The testing and investigation of patients should be limited, as such measures are resource intensive and can very quickly strain capacities.

WHO has been in close dialogue with influenza vaccine manufacturers. I understand that production of vaccines for seasonal influenza will be completed soon, and that full capacity will be available to ensure the largest possible supply of pandemic vaccine in the months to come.

Pending the availability of vaccines, several non-pharmaceutical interventions can confer some protection.

WHO continues to recommend no restrictions on travel and no border closures.

Influenza pandemics, whether moderate or severe, are remarkable events because of the almost universal susceptibility of the world’s population to infection.

We are all in this together, and we will all get through this, together.

Thank you.



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Swine flu has become a pandemic phenomena as it continue to spread and affect many countries. It is something new and still unknown to many, hence creates "scare" to many people. But current data proves that fatality resulting from AH1N1 is relatively lower compared to other communicable diseases, such as measles or TB for example.

"On present evidence, the overwhelming majority of patients experience mild symptoms and make a rapid and full recovery, often in the absence of any form of medical treatment."

As much as it is infectious, it is also preventable through good hygiene and
proper coughing and sneezing etiquette. This means frequent handwashing especially after touching objects that are frequently touched by other people (example door knobs, toilet flush, etc.). handwashing means using clean water and soap, this is effective enough to remove dirt and disease-causing germs. It would also help a lot if people who cough or sneeze will cover their nose and mouth, preferably with a disposable tissue. Maintaining a distance of at least 3 meters when talking to a person known to be ill also prevent transmission.

"As we know from experience, severity can vary, depending on many factors, from one country to another."

In Laos, foreigners can be found in any part of the country. I was so surprised to see falangs all over Lao, whether in the major tourist attactions, mountains, even in the rural,  most remote villages. Your country is beautiful that foreigners love to see even the remotest area.  This situation can put your country at high risk it preventive measures are not instituted accordingly. This could be aggravated by lack of clean water facilities, poor hygiene practices and lack of adequate health care facilities.

I also observed the practice of putting a basin with water and cut lime at the entrance of many restaurants which is used by local and foreign people alike to wash hands before eating. No soap and the water is not replaced frequently, making it a good breeding place for germs. This practice has to change otherwise flu virus could spread fast if it indeed enter Laos.

"Worldwide, the number of deaths is small. Each and every one of these deaths is tragic, and we have to brace ourselves to see more. However, we do not expect to see a sudden and dramatic jump in the number of severe or fatal infections."

This statement is promising but it does not mean any country can be complacent. Particularly since Laos has a lot of risk factors.

"Although the pandemic appears to have moderate severity in comparatively well-off countries, it is prudent to anticipate a bleaker picture as the virus spreads to areas with limited resources, poor health care, and a high prevalence of underlying medical problems."

I hope your Ministry of Health is already prepared and initiating a very stong advocacy, especially in schools and work places, where the infection is now known to spread fast.

Many viruses are self limiting, meaning they die on their own sometimes even without intervention. Lest just hope and pray that this virus would die on its own soon!

It has hit our country already but so far things are under control because we've prapared. I hope it will not strike a hard blow to Lao, especially since you have this honorable opportunity of hosting the SEA Games, which could be a very good opportunity for other nations to know and appreciate Lao. I hope this AH1N1 nightmare will be over way before the SEAG.

Good luck!

 



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Anonymous

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This should be one more good reason for people in Laos to kick their habit of spitting everywhere, including in markets & inside buses.

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First H1N1 case in Laos:

http://www.unlao.org/UN_System/Documents/Influenza%20A%20_H1N1_%20-%20WHO%20Lao%20CO%20update%20no%2022%20SPECIAL%20UPDATE%20-%2017th%20June%202009.pdf

Lao PDR's first case of new influenza A (H1N1) was confirmed on Tuesday, 16 June 2009, by the National Center for Laboratory and Epidemiology (NCLE). The affected person has not required hospitalisation and is currently isolated at home. He is reported by health services to be "doing well". The identity of the person has not been made public in accordance with government and WHO privacy rules.

A sample was collected from the patient late on 15 June and sent to NCLE for testing. The positive result was confirmed and reported to WHO on June 16th using Real-Time PCR testing with materials specifically designed to detect the new A/H1N1 influenza, provided by USCDC.

As of 16 June 2009, there were 35,928 confirmed cases of new influenza A (H1N1) in 76 countries with 163 deaths. Amongst Lao PDR's neighbours, there are currently 201 confirmed cases in Thailand, 25 in Viet Nam, and 362 in China.



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