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Anonymous

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Laos experiencing mobile boom !!!
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After years of under-performance, Laos is on the way to economic growth. The mobile sector is attracting investment for many reasons including supplying telecoms to successful hydro-electric and mining projects.

Research and Markets has announced the addition of a new report Laos - telecoms, mobile, broadband and forecasts. The report includes research data and analysis on Laos, covering trends and developments in telecommunications, mobile, internet, broadband, infrastructure and regulation.

There was no hiding the fact that Laos has had to struggle for years with a poorly performing economy and a commercial environment that was in desperate need of reform. However, in the 2006-7 period there was a noticeable shift in the outlook for the country with positive news being reported on many fronts. Most importantly, a significant number of hydro-electric power projects and mining ventures have become or are close to reality, with many more possible projects in the pipeline.

Laos is at last moving forward in a confident fashion. It is also moving forward in its efforts to strengthen its telecommunications infrastructure, to attract more foreign investment into the sector and to introduce the latest telecom technologies.

As attention turned to building the country's infrastructure, by early 2009 fixed-line teledensity stood at less than two telephones per 100 people, with virtually no growth; however, the mobile market has been surging in a sustained fashion, especially since 2004-5. Coming into 2009, mobile penetration was around 32% with an annual growth rate running at 25%. Internet services are lagging badly, however, this being a major concern in terms of the overall social and economic development of the country.

While more foreign investment is needed to boost the telecom sector, the government must also be judicious in selecting and licensing new operators to ensure that it gets the best value out of the investment. The joint venture formed by the government with Thai company Shinawatra in 1996 let the five-year period of market exclusivity granted to Lao Telecom pass without any serious attention to infrastructure building. When the market was opened up to competition in 2002, foreign capital finally started to flow. The mobile phone market took off in early 2003, with the number of subscribers increasing sevenfold in the two years following.

The Lao telecom sector still has many issues to address. The rate of regulatory reform continues to lag well behind industry development and has the potential to derail the progress already made if the reform is not speeded up.

Research and Markets singles out several key highlights affecting Laos:

the mobile market in Laos continued on its positive expansion path in 2008, with annual growth of 30% for the year; growth was continuing at a similar pace into 2009;
with 32% mobile penetration, the mobile market had reached the two million subscriber milestone by April 2009;

the government having licensed six mobile operators, competition was heating up by 2008-9, putting considerable downward pressure on ARPU;
the launch of Laos Telecom's 3G service in July 2008 was an important move for the local telecom sector, although the subscriber sign-up rate to March 2009 remained only modest;

the sluggish development of Internet services continues to be a problem for the both the local telecom industry in particular and the country in general, especially given how crucial online access is to national growth.

The new report provides not only an overview of several subjects but also of and several companies relevant to Laos.

http://developingtelecoms.com/research-and-markets-laos-experiencing-mobile-boom-attracting-investment.html



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Just what every monk needs, a mobile phone so he can talk to poo sao's with. Maybe now Ajharn can know where his novice monks are at now so they can go for alms at 5am in the morning and not be late anymore. So instead of donating money to the temple, just buy them a phone card instead, it will save them some time in refilling their mobiles. That can be the new item to bring for "duk baht" instead of the usual rice and fruits, phone cards, they will love you for it!

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Anonymous

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How to know which card they want? Maybe you give ETL, they want Tango. No merit, wrong card.

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Anonymous

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SayMyName wrote:

Just what every monk needs, a mobile phone so he can talk to poo sao's with. Maybe now Ajharn can know where his novice monks are at now so they can go for alms at 5am in the morning and not be late anymore. So instead of donating money to the temple, just buy them a phone card instead, it will save them some time in refilling their mobiles. That can be the new item to bring for "duk baht" instead of the usual rice and fruits, phone cards, they will love you for it!



What it to you! and for your information there is no such word as " duk baht" in Lao language ok knuckle head. In Lao we say " Tuk baht"

 



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Anonymous

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Anonymous wrote:

 

After years of under-performance, Laos is on the way to economic growth. The mobile sector is attracting investment for many reasons including supplying telecoms to successful hydro-electric and mining projects.

Research and Markets has announced the addition of a new report Laos - telecoms, mobile, broadband and forecasts. The report includes research data and analysis on Laos, covering trends and developments in telecommunications, mobile, internet, broadband, infrastructure and regulation.

There was no hiding the fact that Laos has had to struggle for years with a poorly performing economy and a commercial environment that was in desperate need of reform. However, in the 2006-7 period there was a noticeable shift in the outlook for the country with positive news being reported on many fronts. Most importantly, a significant number of hydro-electric power projects and mining ventures have become or are close to reality, with many more possible projects in the pipeline.

Laos is at last moving forward in a confident fashion. It is also moving forward in its efforts to strengthen its telecommunications infrastructure, to attract more foreign investment into the sector and to introduce the latest telecom technologies.

As attention turned to building the country's infrastructure, by early 2009 fixed-line teledensity stood at less than two telephones per 100 people, with virtually no growth; however, the mobile market has been surging in a sustained fashion, especially since 2004-5. Coming into 2009, mobile penetration was around 32% with an annual growth rate running at 25%. Internet services are lagging badly, however, this being a major concern in terms of the overall social and economic development of the country.

While more foreign investment is needed to boost the telecom sector, the government must also be judicious in selecting and licensing new operators to ensure that it gets the best value out of the investment. The joint venture formed by the government with Thai company Shinawatra in 1996 let the five-year period of market exclusivity granted to Lao Telecom pass without any serious attention to infrastructure building. When the market was opened up to competition in 2002, foreign capital finally started to flow. The mobile phone market took off in early 2003, with the number of subscribers increasing sevenfold in the two years following.

The Lao telecom sector still has many issues to address. The rate of regulatory reform continues to lag well behind industry development and has the potential to derail the progress already made if the reform is not speeded up.

Research and Markets singles out several key highlights affecting Laos:

the mobile market in Laos continued on its positive expansion path in 2008, with annual growth of 30% for the year; growth was continuing at a similar pace into 2009;
with 32% mobile penetration, the mobile market had reached the two million subscriber milestone by April 2009;

the government having licensed six mobile operators, competition was heating up by 2008-9, putting considerable downward pressure on ARPU;
the launch of Laos Telecom's 3G service in July 2008 was an important move for the local telecom sector, although the subscriber sign-up rate to March 2009 remained only modest;

the sluggish development of Internet services continues to be a problem for the both the local telecom industry in particular and the country in general, especially given how crucial online access is to national growth.

The new report provides not only an overview of several subjects but also of and several companies relevant to Laos.

http://developingtelecoms.com/research-and-markets-laos-experiencing-mobile-boom-attracting-investment.html

 




ຕາມຫຼັກການສາດສະໜາແທ້ໆ ພຣະສົງບໍ່ມີສິດ ໄຊ້ສິ່ງຂອງເລົ່ານີ້



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Anonymous

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shame for showing this picture!!! thank youdisbeliefdisbeliefdisbelief

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"knuckle head"? Are you okay? How come you always have to call people disrespectful names even though I may be older than you? Did your parents not teach you well? Are you that low of an animal? Can you not communicate like a civilized human being?

"Duk Baht" is in parenthesis for a reason, it means to sound it out correctly cause there is NO english word for it. Can you hear me say it, no. Tuk baht? That doesn't sound right either if you know any english. How about Duck Baht, Dhuct Baht, Duct Bhat, Thuck baht, thukt baht.... etc. "What it to you". Just write it in Laos then if you want it spelled correctly cause it's a Laos word.
I know you are going to reply by insulting me with names again so I'm not going to reply anymore to someone as uncivilized as you, so hate all you want, I'll just laugh.

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N95...the same as my phone,,,

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Anonymous

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SayMyName wrote:

"knuckle head"? Are you okay? How come you always have to call people disrespectful names even though I may be older than you? Did your parents not teach you well? Are you that low of an animal? Can you not communicate like a civilized human being?

"Duk Baht" is in parenthesis for a reason, it means to sound it out correctly cause there is NO english word for it. Can you hear me say it, no. Tuk baht? That doesn't sound right either if you know any english. How about Duck Baht, Dhuct Baht, Duct Bhat, Thuck baht, thukt baht.... etc. "What it to you". Just write it in Laos then if you want it spelled correctly cause it's a Laos word.
I know you are going to reply by insulting me with names again so I'm not going to reply anymore to someone as uncivilized as you, so hate all you want, I'll just laugh.



Laugh at yourself KNUCKLE HEAD!! biggrinbiggrin

 



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Anonymous

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SayMyName wrote:

"knuckle head"? Are you okay? How come you always have to call people disrespectful names even though I may be older than you? Did your parents not teach you well? Are you that low of an animal? Can you not communicate like a civilized human being?

"Duk Baht" is in parenthesis for a reason, it means to sound it out correctly cause there is NO english word for it. Can you hear me say it, no. Tuk baht? That doesn't sound right either if you know any english. How about Duck Baht, Dhuct Baht, Duct Bhat, Thuck baht, thukt baht.... etc. "What it to you". Just write it in Laos then if you want it spelled correctly cause it's a Laos word.
I know you are going to reply by insulting me with names again so I'm not going to reply anymore to someone as uncivilized as you, so hate all you want, I'll just laugh.



What the heck are you talking about? If you want people to know what you're saying then you certainly needed to write it correctly! Parenthesis or not.no

Example:

" Duk Baht" sounds like you're saying ດັກບາດ rather than ຕັກບາດ which is a correct way to say it in Lao language.

 



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I like the roaming services of Laos. Unlike India which floods roamers with expensive spam messages (they send you these useless spams like 7-10x a day and your unit gets charged for such messages that you didn't ask for or need), I never experienced spam messages in Laos roaming.





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" needed to write it correctly! Parenthesis or not."
Sorry I didn't know this was a communist board. Everyone writes in broken english why don't you go and scold them. I'll continue to write it as "duk baht" cause I just like to. I guess they don't have freedom of speech in communist Laos.

KNUCKLE HEAD!! I laughed when I read that, I guess you are running out of names to call me?

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Anonymous

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SayMyName wrote:

" needed to write it correctly! Parenthesis or not."
Sorry I didn't know this was a communist board. Everyone writes in broken english why don't you go and scold them. I'll continue to write it as "duk baht" cause I just like to. I guess they don't have freedom of speech in communist Laos.

KNUCKLE HEAD!! I laughed when I read that, I guess you are running out of names to call me?



You're  a dumb BIATCH/ KNUCK HEAD is the only name that fits you!biggrinbiggrin
The last time I checked Laos was and is a communist country, sure as hell can't take a hint! The whole  world already knew about it.

Helloooo, the who world already knew about this, that's right you're too dumb to get out under the rock that's why you're so clueless?confuseclueless.gif

HA HA HA........

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