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Lao may suffer from water shortage this summer
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Officials caution of summer water shortage

Vientiane Times, 17.02.2010


A senior official from the National Centre for Environmental Health and
Water Supply has advised people who use natural water sources to
preserve or grow more trees to counteract the water shortage this summer.

Centre Director Dr Soutsakhone Chanthaphone told Vientiane Times
yesterday that every year in March, April and May the weather is very
hot and dry, which reduces the supply of water from natural sources.
These include artesian wells, bore wells and surface water.

“If people face a shortage of water during this time, they should make
their wells deeper or dig new wells closer to a river. However, this is
only a short term solution,” Dr Soutsakhone said.

“Reducing water consumption and growing trees are sustainable ways to
conserve natural water sources.”

He said that every year in the dry season, a shortage of water occurs in
many areas, especially in the central and southern parts of Laos .
Clearing forests and possibly climate change is also reducing river
levels each year.

Officials from the National Centre for Environmental Health and Water
Supply, the Centre of Information and Education for Health, districts
and provinces have provided health education to communities around the
country to make sure they are not at risk of health problems.

“We advised people to preserve forests because trees slow water runoff
and allow it to soak into the soil and recharge the water table,” Dr
Soutsakhone said.

He said people can use water from artesian wells, bore wells and surface
systems for bathing and washing clothes.

However, this water should be treated with chorine or boiled if it is to
be consumed.

People can drink water supplied by the government's piped system, Nam
Papa, because it has already been treated.

The government aims for 90 percent of people in both rural and urban
areas to have access to clean water by 2020, with 80 percent to have
access to hygienic latrines.

Dr Soutsakhone estimated that 85 percent of all communities should have
access to clean water by 2015 and expects to exceed the target of 75
percent in 2010.

He also advised people who have already installed clean water systems to
ensure cleanliness around the site.

Villagers should build animal pens and household toilets at least 15 to
30 metres away from clean water systems to reduce contamination.





Vientiane Times, 17.02.2010


A senior official from the National Centre for Environmental Health and
Water Supply has advised people who use natural water sources to
preserve or grow more trees to counteract the water shortage this summer.

Centre Director Dr Soutsakhone Chanthaphone told Vientiane Times
yesterday that every year in March, April and May the weather is very
hot and dry, which reduces the supply of water from natural sources.
These include artesian wells, bore wells and surface water.

“If people face a shortage of water during this time, they should make
their wells deeper or dig new wells closer to a river. However, this is
only a short term solution,” Dr Soutsakhone said.

“Reducing water consumption and growing trees are sustainable ways to
conserve natural water sources.”

He said that every year in the dry season, a shortage of water occurs in
many areas, especially in the central and southern parts of Laos .
Clearing forests and possibly climate change is also reducing river
levels each year.

Officials from the National Centre for Environmental Health and Water
Supply, the Centre of Information and Education for Health, districts
and provinces have provided health education to communities around the
country to make sure they are not at risk of health problems.

“We advised people to preserve forests because trees slow water runoff
and allow it to soak into the soil and recharge the water table,” Dr
Soutsakhone said.

He said people can use water from artesian wells, bore wells and surface
systems for bathing and washing clothes.

However, this water should be treated with chorine or boiled if it is to
be consumed.

People can drink water supplied by the government's piped system, Nam
Papa, because it has already been treated.

The government aims for 90 percent of people in both rural and urban
areas to have access to clean water by 2020, with 80 percent to have
access to hygienic latrines.

Dr Soutsakhone estimated that 85 percent of all communities should have
access to clean water by 2015 and expects to exceed the target of 75
percent in 2010.

He also advised people who have already installed clean water systems to
ensure cleanliness around the site.

Villagers should build animal pens and household toilets at least 15 to
30 metres away from clean water systems to reduce contamination.





-- Edited by 2010 on Wednesday 17th of February 2010 09:42:55 PM

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Anonymous

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What a suprised...I am sure all those dams along the mekong
river had nothing to do with the water shortage problem.  Do
you think that the chinese is going to cared about the water
shortage problem at all? ....maybe just a little? after all laos is
one of the chinese closest  friend.   I am pretty sure they are
going to let the laotians down. 

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Anonymous

Date:
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Anonymous wrote:

What a suprised...I am sure all those dams along the mekong
river had nothing to do with the water shortage problem.  Do
you think that the chinese is going to cared about the water
shortage problem at all? ....maybe just a little? after all laos is
one of the chinese closest  friend.   I am pretty sure they are
going to let the laotians down. 



          What do you mean by that? I am pretty sure they are going to let the Laotians down? They are or they are not going to let Lao people down? Watch your English language.

 



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Anonymous

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Why is there water shortage in Laos.  There're rivers and water every where and Laos is a country with such small number of population comparing to Vietnam.

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Anonymous

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It's alway happened in the summertime ever sine i was borned, just wait for Raining season that's all. why are they just worry now???

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Anonymous

Date:
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Anonymous wrote:

It's alway happened in the summertime ever sine i was borned, just wait for Raining season that's all. why are they just worry now???





We wont have much rain as usual because they cut the trees so muck.

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Anonymous

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Anonymous wrote:

Anonymous wrote:

It's alway happened in the summertime ever sine i was borned, just wait for Raining season that's all. why are they just worry now???




 


We wont have much rain as usual because they cut the trees so muck.

Talking  about tree, our Country still greenest country on the face of the earth. and i don't really think the tree can produce the Rain. except it' can help clean bad envirinment like pollution and suck green house gas and carbon dioxid from the car...

 



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Anonymous

Date:
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Anonymous wrote:

 

Anonymous wrote:

It's alway happened in the summertime ever sine i was borned, just wait for Raining season that's all. why are they just worry now???




 


We wont have much rain as usual because they cut the trees so muck.

 



Trees have nothing to do with rain.  It even rain over the oceans.  What you need are dams to store water when it's plentiful.

 



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Guru

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Posts: 2386
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I M NOT REAALLY SURE THAT THE NAM PAPA THAT WE DRINK AND USE IS CLEAN ENOUGH OR CAN BE AVOIDED KIDNEY STONE?? 2000 -3000 KIP FOR 20l IS STILL ACCEPTABLE.

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animated-graphics247.gif



Anonymous

Date:
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khonthakek wrote:

I M NOT REAALLY SURE THAT THE NAM PAPA THAT WE DRINK AND USE IS CLEAN ENOUGH OR CAN BE AVOIDED KIDNEY STONE?? 2000 -3000 KIP FOR 20l IS STILL ACCEPTABLE.



Even when we lived in Laos we used to always boiled our drinking water.

 



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Anonymous

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Director Dr Soutsakhone Chanthaphone from the National Centre for Environmental Health and Water Supply is absolutely correct.

Trees do help sustain water levels, they keep water from running off and shade the ground from the sun in the dry season. If you've ever walked in the mountains in December notice who it's still very damp under the big trees, where the trees are cut all is dry.

Many people are experiencing drier wells this year. Laos has many rivers and streams and forests, but the natural resources must be protected or Laos will look like a hot dry place and the people will be thirsty.

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