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Post Info TOPIC: Is this true about university in Laos ?
Anonymous

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Is this true about university in Laos ?
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I went to a friends graduation from the National University of Laos (NUOL) a few weeks ago.

Education here, at all levels, is slowly rebuilding after decades of communist isolation from the global community. I don't think it was ever of a terribly high standard so it is trying to build from a very low base. During the Communist era it was really only the Temple schools, Sangha, that kept educational standards as high as they could.

The Government makes much noise about improving educational standards but also complains that it lacks the funds to make significant advances.

Primary education is compulsory and mostly free but after that it is pay, pay, pay. Despite that the teachers are poorly trained and even worse paid. Primary teachers are amongst the poorest in the community earning just $1-$2 a day. In many rural areas they regularly go unpaid when Provincial authorities complain they have run out of money.

City schools are not much better with many teachers only surviving by taking second jobs as waiters at night or moonlighting as private tutors for extra pay. I am told there is even a level of petty corruption as students fear being "failed" if they do not give the teachers "gifts". Teachers even help students in the public exams by pointing out the answers to those students that can afford it.

Entrance to NUoL is competitive and a percentage are admitted on scholarships through public exams but many also "buy" there way in. You can see the affluence of these students as they pull out their mobile phones or digital cameras to photograph me when I walk around the campus.

I meet many students around the city in bars and restaurants. It seems a favourite activity is to find a farang and try to get them to "sponsor" them in their studies. Fifty or a hundred dollars a month is not much for the farang but goes a long way with the genuinely poor students.

Private education flourishes here. There are several big international schools and colleges that provide secondary and business management courses. It is not uncommon for students to be enrolled in both the NUoL and a private business college. A Chinese University has just announced they are setting up a local Campus as a feeder into their system.

Tertiary education here is also much more authoritarian.

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I was really staggered at the number of family and well wishers at the graduation. I knew that it was a big deal with the Laos but I really had no idea just how big. There must have been more than 30 000 people there. The streets for kilometres leading up to the Campus was lined with stalls selling flowers, which is a traditional gift for the graduand.



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Students, at both private and public colleges have to wear a uniform on campus and participate in some sort of military parades and activities. This has lead to an amusing situation at my local waterhole ... the Crazy Cricket. One of the bargirls dresses in ordinary fashionable street clothes for work, then changes into her school uniform to go off to study, and then returns later still in uniform to serve behind the bar again. You sometimes see students in uniform drinking in the bars (although I dont think they are supposed to be in uniform) and you have to keep telling yourself that they are probably in their twenties and quite legally there.

At the same time, the College or University is much more authoritarian than our western institutions.

My young friend was one of 5000 graduates at the NUOL ceremony last month. As he lined up to receive his certificate he was told by one of the Professors that his hair was too long (it barely touched his collar) and he would not be allowed to get his document unless he had a haircut. So he had to rush out, have his haircut and get back in time. Which he managed to do.

Its all a bit of a head spin.


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http://ironbark.livejournal.com/290563.html


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Anonymous

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Entrance to NUoL is competitive and a percentage are admitted on scholarships through public exams but many also "buy" there way in. You can see the affluence of these students as they pull out their mobile phones or digital cameras to photograph me when I walk around the campus.

You should say "but many also buy "their" way in. Not buy there way in.


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Anonymous

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which is a traditional gift for the graduand.?

What does that mean "graduand"?


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Anonymous

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Graduand means the students that just graduated for finished bachelor degree from University...


Real Laotian ... in Vientiane...

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Senior Member

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real meaning of the graduand - A university student who has completed the requirements for, but has not yet been awarded, a particular degree

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Anonymous

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Despite that the teachers are poorly trained

What I was told is that to be a primary school teacher, you can enter Teachers' Training College (1) after finishing Por. 5, & study for 4 years, (2) after finishing Mor. 3 & study for 3 years, or (3) after Mor. 6 & study for just 1 year...it's the first time I've ever heard of people entering college after finishing primary school...This site has more details:
http://luangnamthamarathon.wordpress.com/college-profile/

What a few rural teachers told me was that once they leave college, that's the end of their teacher training for a long long time...& they just keep repeating the same lessons in the village school for years & years for generations of kids...meanwhile the outside world moves on, & some of their knowledge  & teaching techniques become totally outdated, frozen in time dating back to the year of graduation. Their students who are lucky enough to go on to secondary schools in the town or city discover this when they find the transition from Por. 5 to Mor. 1 a big hurdle.

Primary teachers are amongst the poorest in the community earning just $1-$2 a day. In many rural areas they regularly go unpaid when Provincial authorities complain they have run out of money.

Think Vientiane Times has mentioned in the past how teachers' salaries have been delayed for as long as half a year before due to red tape - something about delay in release of funds from Ministry to Finance to Ministry of Education, then time taken for money to trickle down to province & finally district level. Many foreign NGOs & individuals (including Lao nok) are funding the building of new school facilities in rural Laos because the Ministry of Education doesn't seem to have funds for schools like these:
http://www.freunde-laos.de/13.html (second photo below)

City schools are not much better with many teachers only surviving by taking second jobs as waiters at night or moonlighting as private tutors for extra pay.

In rural areas, some also earn extra income as trekking guides if they can speak some English. Others simply quit teaching & work in guesthouses for better pay.

I am told there is even a level of petty corruption as students fear being "failed" if they do not give the teachers "gifts".


None of my Lao friends have encountered this yet, but it's supposedly common in Indonesia (Chinese Indonesians are targeted by such teachers). Am told that Singapore has a rule whereby all civil servants have to declare & turn in any gifts they receive that are worth more than S$10 (about 60,000kip)...if they want to keep it they have to pay for it, if not it I think it becomes property of the government (dunno what their government does with it :P).

Entrance to NUoL is competitive and a percentage are admitted on scholarships through public exams but many also "buy" there way in.

Heard of this too. Know students who have been told to pay up to 2 million kip for a place. Something related to how university staff can be allocated a place for their kids (? anyone working in NUOL can clarify?), & some staff sell off this place. I'd rather use that 2 million kip to put the student through a year of private college.

It seems a favourite activity is to find a farang and try to get them to "sponsor" them in their studies. Fifty or a hundred dollars a month is not much for the farang but goes a long way with the genuinely poor students.

Don't know of farangs sponsoring such large sums - more like a hundred dollars per year (not month) for tuition fees. Some farangs have even started organisations to raise funds for such purposes. Look at www.leot.org.uk for example.

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rexha03

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If this rumor is true, I would definitely find a way to enroll on this kind of good environment school. Most people are dreaming on going school abroad and that dream is not so easy to take, In fact you need a lot of requirements just to be a students of university in Laos. Hopefully, this rumor will come true and while I am waiting for this rumor to become true, I just play plants vs zombies free download full version for pc and fgo gacha rates for the meantime.



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